Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Rick Jamm’

Jamsphere Music Review Dream Field – Domino Grey & Donna S

September 11, 2015 Leave a comment

Dream Field album review by Jamsphere

Domino Grey featuring Donna S. – “Dream Field” encapsulates the essence of music itself: creativity, passion, skill!

The album “Dream Field” is the combination of producer Domino Grey and multi-instrumentalist Donna S. The two came together to create music that is Jazz-Hop in spirit. The album which contains 11 tracks includes “A New World” from the Butterfly Affect series which is given new treatment, as Donna S. adds her touch, as well as the bonus “Melody Diagnosis” from the Back In The Black release. This is neither pure jazz nor hardcore hip-hop but rather an extension of the two. In other words, this is quite simply an inspired album. The sax from Donna S is sharp, sexy, lyrical and creative, while Domino Grey is as musical as his ever have been on the boards and keys.

The album cover

“Dream Field” is a real high-water mark in the electronic, hip-hop and jazz instrumental crossover field, one that doesn’t seem under any real threat of being surpassed for a little while. Different themes and tempos come together in this urban quilt of jazz-hop textures to make this one of my favorite Domino Grey albums. If you like a groove, but prefer the kind of sophisticated cool you can play even for your parents over the hard core you only listen to when you’re in full party mode, “Dream Field” is for you.

For whatever reason most jazz-hop albums fail but this one works, and I think it’s because of the sax, which as opposed to voice, has a sweeter, rounder, more inviting sound. Thus being less alienating, no matter which side of jazz-hop, you’re coming from. This blend is at its finest here, being inventive, original and in your face, while showcasing both ‘street-based’ and introspective tunes. The album opener “Stylus Grande” takes fusion to another level with an amazing rhythmic groove and some straight Sax hooks.

Donna S. blowing her horn!

It’s on track 3 – “Magic King”, that Donna S breaks free with some serious phrasing while Domino Grey turns up the sound effects. From there on out, the two turn up the heat and the tempo on “Hold Them Off A Little While”. “Fade Distorts” fuses some intense sax lines with beats, samples, instruments and what sounds like some direct voices talking from the studio, into some eclectic lounge loving jazz.

The formula for the most part works extremely well. Donna S blends really well with these jazz-hop-centered beats. And nowhere does she shine much brighter with some thrusty melodic blowing than on, “Top Floor Moorings”, which runs over a straight driving beat by Domino Grey“A New World” is a more of the same ear candy, but percussively aggrandized with respect to the previous track.

However it’s not the genre-fusion in itself that makes this such a great album; it’s the way in which it is fused that is impressive; “Abstraction Layers” and “Melody Diagnosis” proves the case in point. Domino brings in the most disparate electronic and organic sounds to cook in his musical melting-pot on this album. I don’t think anybody has done a better jazz-hop ‘fusion’ job than this so far. “Dream Field” is a far cry from the nonsense which passes as music in the mainstream culture. This album encapsulates the essence of music itself: creativity, passion, skill – it is amazing, and so are its primary interpreters, Domino Grey and Donna S.

OFFICIAL LINKS: WEBSITETWITTERFACEBOOKSOUNDCLOUDBLOG

http://jamsphere.com/reviews/domino-grey-featuring-donna-s-dream-field-encapsulates-the-essence-of-music-itself-creativity-passion-skill

Advertisements

Domino Grey interview with JamSphere 20 Questions Deep with Rick Jamm!

Twenty Questions: DOMINO GREY – The Intellectual Electronic Music Artist!

 

Source:  http://jamsphere.com/twentyquestions/twenty-questions-domino-grey-the-intellectual-electronic-music-artist

Domino Grey Electronic Musician

Thinkin…Thinkin….

Electronic Music producer, Domino Grey from New York, has influences that range from HipHop to Deep House. He is part of a group that releases instrumental music under the name Fallout Shelter and producing records as Drew Spence and Dynamics Plus. Recently in an exclusive interview, Domino confirmed that his  prowess and skills are not only confined to keyboards and mixing desks. The man (and artist) comes across as a rational and intelligent being, who completely understands his art and the sacrifices necessary to move within, and more importantly around and outside of its boundaries successfully.

1. How long have you been doing what you’re doing and how did you get started in the first place?

Domino Grey: It’s been a few years now doing electronic music after many years doing Hip Hop and Rap. I think there’s some kind of artistic debt in trying to give the same kinds of experiences with my music that I had, when I was younger. I want to recreate what I felt then for someone else.

2. Who were the first influences on your sound and who do you consider the most influential electronic music producer in your genre today?

Domino Grey: Influential for today, I would say Deadmou5 and for dub enthusiasts, Skrillex -more so, for what they have accomplished, than their musical sensibilities overall. I think many artists see them as the end goal for their musical aspirations. It’s a little funny when the kids only look at their last two years in the big spotlight and think that’s all there is to it. So easy. Those are developed artists with long histories and are not overnight success stories. I tend to be inspired by ideas and not sounds or production techniques.

3. Do you remember the first piece of software or equipment that you actually purchased, for your productions, with your own money?

Domino Grey: First, I’m not so sure of, but most significant would be the Ensoniq ASR0-10 sampling keyboard. I bought it brand new from Sam Ash for over 2 grand, at a time when you didn’t know who else was using it besides yourself. There wasn’t a fantasy in my head like if I get this, I’ll be just like so and so. It was all about what it could do for me. When I forked over the money I thought “Okay, now you’d better be serious about this.”
READ MORE

Jamsphere.com reviews Domino Grey Butterfly Affect II: Pretty Imposter

DOMINO GREY: “Butterfly Affect II Pretty Imposter”

Creative Nourishment For The Mind!

Source: http://jamsphere.com/reviews/domino-grey-butterfly-affect-ii-pretty-imposter-creative-nourishment-for-the-mind

Domino Grey Pretty Imposter

She posed as someone else to look like herself

Whether you find yourself rocking to and fro in your favorite armchair on a mind trip, or grooving enthusiastically across the club floor, this Ep acts as a really nice soundtrack. Atmospheric and spacey, Domino Grey illustrates his profound grasp of Electronic Music, proving he is able, to incorporate exquisite beat pulses and sounds into his intelligent motifs.

D.O.M.I.N.O. Dance Or Move In Natural Order G.R.E.Y. Generate Rhythmic Energy Yourself. In two simple words DOMINO GREY. Domino Grey is an Electronic Music producer from New York. His influences range from HipHop to Deep House. He is part of a group that releases instrumental music under the name Fallout Shelter and producing records as Drew Spence and Dynamics Plus. His newest project is contributing to the soundtrack of the Mark of the Griffin web series and comic book. It’s about a regular guy turned into a vigilante-like superhero that’s not so super. After creating the video, Domino adds his music as the final signature.

I’ve been performing, producing and writing about music for almost 30 years now. Back in the old days I hustled my way around the major labels, while today I have chosen to work in the grinding indie music market. Throughout all this time I have come to distinguish two types of music artists. There’s the genuine musician who simply creates music he feels, and let’s everyone else put their own personal label to it. All he cares about is the music. Then there is your ‘hope to make it big’, hype-and-image variety of artist, who is so unsure about what everyone else will call what his doing, that he labels himself. Just in case everyone else gets it wrong (?)!

Ninety-nine percent of the time, I know who’s making music worth listening to, before I even hear a single note, just by listening to, or reading how artists introduce themselves. A few days ago a kid approached me and asked: “Hey, I’d like you to review my music, I’m a Deep Soulful House artist, do you think you know this music well enough, to handle it?” My answer was, what it has always been for the last 30 years, and taken from a phrase I heard somewhere as a kid. “Unfortunately I only know two types of music. Good and Bad. If you fall into one of those genres, send your music along!” Needless to say, the kid was flabbergasted, and it took him a while to understand.

—————————

—————————

READ MORE …..