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The People’s Opinion review Rocket Science the album + videos

November 10, 2014 Leave a comment

Dynamics Plus

– Rap and Hip Hop with an experimental twist

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A penny for their thoughts

reviewed by Emissary on ThePeoplesOpinion.net

 

 Nowadays, things are quite different. An independent musician can produce quality, marketable music, without sacrificing creativity. This is why “Rocket Science”, the latest Rap/Hip Hop album by Dynamics Plus’ is real example to indie musicians, regardless of genre.

*seeing a nice trend when the videos are being mentioned with the reviews.

 

A long time ago in music… the term “Indie” or “Independent” equaled bad production quality, low fidelity and/or music that was not marketable. Rap and Hip Hop artists, specially, could spend years selling tapes out of the trunk of his car, before anyone took real notice. Nowadays, things are quite different. An independent musician can produce quality, marketable music, without sacrificing creativity. This is why “Rocket Science”, the latest Rap/Hip Hop album by Dynamics Plus’ is real example to indie musicians, regardless of genre.

Pop the playlist below; you’re sure to get hooked by those crunchy riffs in “Dash the Cloud”, by Anthony Michael Angelo. Not what you expected from a Rap album? Get ready for more surprises!

As you’ll notice, Dynamics Plus’ videos are fairly simple – no insane special effects, or irrelevant bullshit. Everything is well thought out and significant to the stories being told.  Kudos on great directing and editing!

“Phase Shift”, for example, is a reality check. Artists big and small, from rappers to rockers, are subject to manipulation within the modern music industry.

This rapper isn’t afraid to expand on his comfort zone. “Seek End Destroy” is a short, straight to the point rap, featuring some slick dance moves by Alesony. Then there’s “Plenty to Say”, featuring the soulful voice Nae B. The contrast between these two is exceptional, plus there’s some more nice dancing & popping to ease you into the video. “Grace Notes”, another fast-paced rap, will have you bouncing to that break-beat; and that phat, mid-range synth bass!

 

READ THE REST AND WATCH SOME VIDEOS!!

 

The Originality of 90s era rap music

The Originality of 90s era rap music.

Clockwork Rhythms of a Sunband

I have a friend [the rapper Sean Derek] that’s always watching old school videos and listening to 90s era rap mixes. Every so often I get that bug and listen to my old Red Alert, Chuck Chillout and Mr Magic tapes, but I try not to be one of those dudes that think rap and hip hop died after the Golden Age. Sometimes it’s hard- especially when I remember how DIFFERENT every rap group sounded from the other; musically, lyrically, cadence and delivery.

Another friend plays satellite radio and I hear a lot of the newer music and it’s shocking to hear how similar everyone sounds. Swag that’s common isn’t really swag is it? As an emcee from Long Island, the desire to be unique was even greater. When you’re crammed into a project, it’s common to share styles among a close knit crew so it was okay to have a similar style to someone from that building you was buildin wit. Not so in sub-suburbia. We created our music in isolation and you didn’t want to share…anything. We really didn’t expose our music that widely- being paranoid that someone would copy or bite. I can recall a commercially known rapper using the same BREAK BEAT and us thinking they stole the idea from us.

All of this pondering led me to resurrect some of my own earliest recordings and review some of my musical history. “Clockwork Rhythms of a Sunband”: this was made in 1990 and I’m already digging into the abstract lyricism. This one aint that hard to follow, but you could see where the style originated from. That’s Sajo, my homie, doing the intro and outro talk. At the end he says “Thank you for attending this Sunband Production. For all those afraid of tans, Bain de Soleil will protect you. You can’t get sunburn without the Clockwork”.

In closing I do miss those days when rappers strove to be original and push the boundaries of lyricism and style instead of today’s’ rappers who differentiate themselves by trying to out-ignant each other. Our new bar is who is more obsessed with material items, debases women worse while they rely on outrageous quotes that are anywhere but in their lyrics. Oh snap, he’s listening to the audio of an old Roxanne Shante battle. Oh the irony. I wonder what she would thing of all the copycat rappers with similar names. If you’ve just decided to start rappin and you’re thinking about adding Lil or Young to your name, remember the 90s and don’t. Thank you.