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Jamsphere Music Review Dream Field – Domino Grey & Donna S

September 11, 2015 Leave a comment

Dream Field album review by Jamsphere

Domino Grey featuring Donna S. – “Dream Field” encapsulates the essence of music itself: creativity, passion, skill!

The album “Dream Field” is the combination of producer Domino Grey and multi-instrumentalist Donna S. The two came together to create music that is Jazz-Hop in spirit. The album which contains 11 tracks includes “A New World” from the Butterfly Affect series which is given new treatment, as Donna S. adds her touch, as well as the bonus “Melody Diagnosis” from the Back In The Black release. This is neither pure jazz nor hardcore hip-hop but rather an extension of the two. In other words, this is quite simply an inspired album. The sax from Donna S is sharp, sexy, lyrical and creative, while Domino Grey is as musical as his ever have been on the boards and keys.

The album cover

“Dream Field” is a real high-water mark in the electronic, hip-hop and jazz instrumental crossover field, one that doesn’t seem under any real threat of being surpassed for a little while. Different themes and tempos come together in this urban quilt of jazz-hop textures to make this one of my favorite Domino Grey albums. If you like a groove, but prefer the kind of sophisticated cool you can play even for your parents over the hard core you only listen to when you’re in full party mode, “Dream Field” is for you.

For whatever reason most jazz-hop albums fail but this one works, and I think it’s because of the sax, which as opposed to voice, has a sweeter, rounder, more inviting sound. Thus being less alienating, no matter which side of jazz-hop, you’re coming from. This blend is at its finest here, being inventive, original and in your face, while showcasing both ‘street-based’ and introspective tunes. The album opener “Stylus Grande” takes fusion to another level with an amazing rhythmic groove and some straight Sax hooks.

Donna S. blowing her horn!

It’s on track 3 – “Magic King”, that Donna S breaks free with some serious phrasing while Domino Grey turns up the sound effects. From there on out, the two turn up the heat and the tempo on “Hold Them Off A Little While”. “Fade Distorts” fuses some intense sax lines with beats, samples, instruments and what sounds like some direct voices talking from the studio, into some eclectic lounge loving jazz.

The formula for the most part works extremely well. Donna S blends really well with these jazz-hop-centered beats. And nowhere does she shine much brighter with some thrusty melodic blowing than on, “Top Floor Moorings”, which runs over a straight driving beat by Domino Grey“A New World” is a more of the same ear candy, but percussively aggrandized with respect to the previous track.

However it’s not the genre-fusion in itself that makes this such a great album; it’s the way in which it is fused that is impressive; “Abstraction Layers” and “Melody Diagnosis” proves the case in point. Domino brings in the most disparate electronic and organic sounds to cook in his musical melting-pot on this album. I don’t think anybody has done a better jazz-hop ‘fusion’ job than this so far. “Dream Field” is a far cry from the nonsense which passes as music in the mainstream culture. This album encapsulates the essence of music itself: creativity, passion, skill – it is amazing, and so are its primary interpreters, Domino Grey and Donna S.

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http://jamsphere.com/reviews/domino-grey-featuring-donna-s-dream-field-encapsulates-the-essence-of-music-itself-creativity-passion-skill

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More More Sound reviews Rock It Science, the Rocket Science remix album

Rock It Science rocks Rocket Science with More More Sound….

Rock It Science album cover

Rock On Rocket

Music Review

The songs share the same original inner core and “soul” as their original counterparts, yet they have been twisted, stretched, bent and rearranged in order to offer a brand new take on the mood, emotion and environment behind every single song on the track list.

Dynamic Plus – Rock It Science

If you thought that Dynamic Plus managed to deliver an eclectic and forward-thinking record with their album “Rocket Science”, you haven’t heard half of it.

Always striving to push their boundaries and their music, the band compiled a remixed and reworked version of the entire album, re-released as “Rock It Science”.

The songs share the same original inner core and “soul” as their original counterparts, yet they have been twisted, stretched, bent and rearranged in order to offer a brand new take on the mood, emotion and environment behind every single song on the track list. The result? A bass-heavy and groovy hip-hop album with shades of electro.

If you had the chance to enjoy “Rocket Science”, this re-mixed album will be a tasty complement to it. If you are new to the band, you’ll be amazed by their versatility and by the broad musical scope of their vision!

VISIT MORE MORE SOUND

Read the earlier review of Rocket Science from More More Sound here….

(Me Blog says)

Have no idea what this is all about? Peep the product here.

$upport in the Dynamica Music store and iTunes etc….

Music Review by Devon Jackson for “We Can Go Dancing” by Domino Grey

Over a pseudo-tabla-drum synth beat, Grey layers on other, bigger, though not at all overwhelming phrases—Moogish, rhythmic, sci-fi-ish. But nothing too big. Nothing too fast. It’s all very smooth. Very tempered. Very well thought out in terms of production, in terms of the feeling it’s wanting to convey. (As opposed to so many other electronica tunes that come at you pell-mell, or throwing out everything and the kitchen sink.) “We Can Go” is more like background music that’s finally, rightfully given center-stage—to a very mellow rave set in a very evolved near future. Picture—sonically, mind—the work of Paul Hardcastle or Jan Hammer, only without their aggressiveness, without that harsh edginess.

**Shared in a follow-up: I really like this. It’s somehow different without being pronouncedly different. What does that mean? Hmm. That you’re not trying to be different, that you’re not forcing it to be something than what it is. It’s whatever it is without you having over-thought it. Really nice.- Devon Jackson

 Devon Jackson

Devon Jackson
Magazine Editor - Freelance Music Journalist

Devon Jackson has written about music and film for a variety of publications–from Entertainment Weekly and The Village Voice to Rolling Stone and Details. He is also the author of Conspiranoia! and currently the editor of Santa Fean magazine

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Domino Grey Says:

-Following a good review makes a nice place for me to talk about the production of “We Can Go Dancing”. Not much of a track spotlight since this one fell together in a  pretty forward way.  I was grooving to it from the start. The first working had a 4 to the floor drum track that was ‘stolen’ by another song (from B Affect part II) that was just screaming it for it. So I stayed with the disco-y type drum track. DJ Boogiepop is always asking for more effects and filter sweeps in my mixes so I started this one off really Lo-Fi with the song crunched out like a poor radio broadcast. [removed in Europrint version] This is also one the simpler songs when it comes to gear use and the amount of processing. It’s 95% KORG M3 (Music) and Radikal Tech Spectralis 2 (Base and Drops). There’s a little KORG EMX for the drums and a few plugs running in the room after that.

This track became a lead single due to its popularity. It performed best on internet radio stations although a lot of DJs said “Just Look at Me” was the one to watch for. Mostly, I’ve kept them paired together and usually drop one after the other. One of my favorite parts is when the crowd gets noisy in the middle right before the song jumps back in.

And it’s funny that I used a crash. It’s so…cliche and common in most genres of music that it’s not really done in EDM. I was thinking “Yeah, I’m going to drop a classic Rock&Roll splash right as the track restarts. A big one, a  loud one. What’s funny is that it’s the simplest element, but it was also the one I spent the most time working with and agonizing over. I tried and layered over a dozen splashes from every module in the studio and none of them fit. I knew the one in my head was from my old KORG ES-1 Drum machine so I grabbed my recent purchase, the blue-meanie (as I call it) EMX and smashed away. There’s a layer of crashes that I stripped way in the original release that I put back in for the Europrint version.

Well, thanks for supporting my music. You can find it on iTunes, Amazon, Beatport and CDBaby.

A big shout to DJ Boogiepop and People’s Choice Entertainment DJs for giving my music so much burn.

Here’s me website.

Fallout Shelter Elevator Music Volume 1: Bassment Level Review

November 30, 2011 Leave a comment

Fallout Shelter Elevator Music Volume 1: Bassment Level Review

Hey all, the BASSment Level got a review blurbie on the I Can’t Call it Blogsite

Album cover:Fallout Shelter Elevator Music Volume I

Buy Fallout Shelter's BASSment level on iTunes

“I’ve always believed that if you put in the work, the results will come. I don’t do things half-heartedly. Because if I do, then I can expect half-hearted results.”-Michael Jordan

The Fallout Shelters latest efforts (helmed by super-producer & MC Dynamics Plus, along with multiple personalities Domino Grey, Drew Spence, and Xodus Phoenix) is the realization of a dream being reached, a path that puzzled many fans of the producers former hip-hop efforts. However, with any adversity, great opportunity can come out of it.

Elevator Music Volume 1: Bassment Level is the “soundtrack to a new film” in the Dynamic Plus universe (not an actual film, but more of a collection of valuable music in his already immense catalog). Overall, the growth he continues to display as a producer is earning him the acclaim of being the name used as a standard for producers of all genres to follow. On top of this all, he’s just scratching the surface.

 

Don’t know what they’re talking about? Peep this.