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Music Review by Devon Jackson for “We Can Go Dancing” by Domino Grey

Over a pseudo-tabla-drum synth beat, Grey layers on other, bigger, though not at all overwhelming phrases—Moogish, rhythmic, sci-fi-ish. But nothing too big. Nothing too fast. It’s all very smooth. Very tempered. Very well thought out in terms of production, in terms of the feeling it’s wanting to convey. (As opposed to so many other electronica tunes that come at you pell-mell, or throwing out everything and the kitchen sink.) “We Can Go” is more like background music that’s finally, rightfully given center-stage—to a very mellow rave set in a very evolved near future. Picture—sonically, mind—the work of Paul Hardcastle or Jan Hammer, only without their aggressiveness, without that harsh edginess.

**Shared in a follow-up: I really like this. It’s somehow different without being pronouncedly different. What does that mean? Hmm. That you’re not trying to be different, that you’re not forcing it to be something than what it is. It’s whatever it is without you having over-thought it. Really nice.- Devon Jackson

 Devon Jackson

Devon Jackson
Magazine Editor - Freelance Music Journalist

Devon Jackson has written about music and film for a variety of publications–from Entertainment Weekly and The Village Voice to Rolling Stone and Details. He is also the author of Conspiranoia! and currently the editor of Santa Fean magazine

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Domino Grey Says:

-Following a good review makes a nice place for me to talk about the production of “We Can Go Dancing”. Not much of a track spotlight since this one fell together in a  pretty forward way.  I was grooving to it from the start. The first working had a 4 to the floor drum track that was ‘stolen’ by another song (from B Affect part II) that was just screaming it for it. So I stayed with the disco-y type drum track. DJ Boogiepop is always asking for more effects and filter sweeps in my mixes so I started this one off really Lo-Fi with the song crunched out like a poor radio broadcast. [removed in Europrint version] This is also one the simpler songs when it comes to gear use and the amount of processing. It’s 95% KORG M3 (Music) and Radikal Tech Spectralis 2 (Base and Drops). There’s a little KORG EMX for the drums and a few plugs running in the room after that.

This track became a lead single due to its popularity. It performed best on internet radio stations although a lot of DJs said “Just Look at Me” was the one to watch for. Mostly, I’ve kept them paired together and usually drop one after the other. One of my favorite parts is when the crowd gets noisy in the middle right before the song jumps back in.

And it’s funny that I used a crash. It’s so…cliche and common in most genres of music that it’s not really done in EDM. I was thinking “Yeah, I’m going to drop a classic Rock&Roll splash right as the track restarts. A big one, a  loud one. What’s funny is that it’s the simplest element, but it was also the one I spent the most time working with and agonizing over. I tried and layered over a dozen splashes from every module in the studio and none of them fit. I knew the one in my head was from my old KORG ES-1 Drum machine so I grabbed my recent purchase, the blue-meanie (as I call it) EMX and smashed away. There’s a layer of crashes that I stripped way in the original release that I put back in for the Europrint version.

Well, thanks for supporting my music. You can find it on iTunes, Amazon, Beatport and CDBaby.

A big shout to DJ Boogiepop and People’s Choice Entertainment DJs for giving my music so much burn.

Here’s me website.

miniStori Blogsite launches a series on the Domino Grey album Back in the Black

September 12, 2011 2 comments

Domino Grey series on the MiniStori Blogsite  http://ministori.wordpress.com/2011/09/11/grey-days/

There’s a huge series starting with interviews based on the Back in the Black album.

Here we go….

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It isn’t often that we here at ministori are presented with the opportunity to to cover anything of importance. Luckily for myself (and you all) this just happens to be one of those rare occasions. I recently sat down with prolific artist / producer extraordinaire Domino Grey to discuss the new direction of his latest release, Back in the Black

Image of Producer/Artist Domino Grey

Domino in his Dominion

ministori:  The new album is a different animal than the first. What changed about you and your music between albums?

Domino Grey: I think the feedback from the first album built up my confidence enough to really reach out and work with different artists. I was able to send everyone the first album [Get it Up, Lay it Down] and say “This is what I want to do with you, are you in?” Every artist needs that thing that makes them grow up. I feel like I’ve grown doing this.

ministori: What caused you to grow?

Domino Grey: The realization that sometimes… the person you are is keeping you from becoming the person you want to be. I have all kinds of ideas. Some of them get put in the box of someday. Someday I’ll be ready or someday the timing will be just right or someday… I wake up and see that instead of waiting for the world to become… perfect, I can change, adapt and grow into the kind of person that can do today what I didn’t think I could do yesterday. Shit, I hope that made sense.

ministori: How did you go about picking artist to collaborate with, I’ve noticed they were all of the female variety?

Domino Grey: Oh I heard some comments. When the album artwork was done, a few people said stuff like “Oh I see how you pick artists.” It just so happens that they are all attractive, but to be honest I didn’t know what anyone besides the singers in my circle looked like until the records made the album. They could have been hideous wildebeests and they still would have been featured. For real. Song – wise, I just went with the stuff that I connected with and then whatever fit the album’s tone.

ministori: So I guess this was just a best case scenario situation, lucky you. Moving on, your brand of EDM seems to be an amalgam of various musical influences. Do you feel that such a mixture of genres will be a help or a hindrance in expressing your vision and creating a following?

Domino Grey: So far my mix has worked out. The reviews are really good and people are saying they like songs based in genres that they don’t usually check for. I feel like I live in a mix and singles world so banking it all on an album is somewhat of an old thought. I mean, I put a lot of thought into the order of the songs as I try to create a sort of journey. But so many people say I made my own playlist of your stuff or my iPod is on shuffle or a DJ will say I’m playing XYZ tracks and any kind of continuity is broken anyway.

I mean, for EVERY style I dabble in, people say “You should just make that from now on.” The trick is going to be- to make enough music so that they are satisfied. That’s why this album jumped in track count. That’s also why I started the Elevator Music series. That gives me the freedom to collect a group of similar tracks without confining and defining the musical direction of my Domino Grey work.

ministori: So what about the features on the album, how do they fit into your world?

Domino Grey: Well, I could spell out their general feelings, but maybe it would be best for them to speak their piece in their own words.

ministori: I like that.

Oh yeah, I’m really happy with this album. Stay tuned in; I’ve got a very fresh remix EP based around the track “My Heart Never Skips a Beat” [DJ MIKI]. It’s really sick. So thanks for checking out my music and thanks for the interview.

→ To purchase more of Domino Grey’s music check out his iTunes page, or cdbaby for the physical release. And definitely stay tuned for up coming interviews with the female vocal and musical talent of  the album! ↓

 

Read Part II with DJ MIKI