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ministori Blog interviews DJ MIKI from Domino Grey’s Back in the Black

September 14, 2011 2 comments

http://ministori.wordpress.com/2011/09/13/dj-miki/

♡ ✖ Beat

Welcome to the second installment in our series of interviews covering Domino Grey’s sophomore effort, Back in the Black. This time around I’m pleased to introduce my readers to Vancouver’s own DJ MIKI (DJ Miki, dj miki . . . Sorry, I’ve seen it depicted quite a few ways) ↓

She’s featured on track 8 “My Heart Never Skips a Beat” which was so well received it spawned its own EP which is already available on CDbaby and iTunes. After checking out her SoundCloud page I was definitely impressed with her numerous features and original compositions (Especially her Progressive House works, check them out!). I’m sure you’ll be equally intrigued after reading this ↓

ministori: Please tell us a little about your musical path and the creative process behind your songs.

DJ MIKI: Before I write my own music, I need to sit down and listen to some of my favorite artists and inspire from them. Nowadays, we all have sources where we inspire from. Sometimes, I even inspire from movies.

When I watch a really moving scene, I think about what kind of melody would suit the scene and I play it in my head. I also need to visualize when I am writing otherwise it doesn’t make sense when it’s all words on paper. My imagination is another source of inspiration when nothing else works. Music is very much like story telling and you always need a source of inspiration to tell a story. This is my thinking process. I have to have a story to tell my audience, otherwise I won’t feel like my music is getting anywhere.

ministori: There have been a myriad of DJ/Producers within the EDM scene, but very few DJ/Vocalist. How has the dynamic of being a DJ/Vocalist affected your song writing process?

DJ MIKI: To be a DJ, you really have to be willing to share your passion for music with the world. There are very few DJs out there who can be really versatile (producing music, who can do vocals, etc). I really wanted to stand out and be very versatile and use my talents. Being a DJ helps with my song writing process because the music I listen to and play in clubs give me inspiration to create music. I really love music that has emotional vibes. Music shouldn’t just make people dance but it should make people feel emotions.

ministori: Your vocals are featured on the song, “My Heart Never Skips a Beat”. Was there something specific going on in your life that caused you to create such an emotive song?

DJ Miki: I want my music to convey real emotions and feelings that my listeners can relate to and that is what I did with this song. This song is about having lost connection with someone I really cared and loved. But the connection was impossible to find due to some circumstances that got in the way. “My heart never skips a beat” is repeated a lot throughout the song, I wanted this line to signify that I haven’t lost hope yet and still wanted to find that connection with the person I was very fond of.

ministori: What else can you tell about DJ MIKI and what are your plans for the near future?

DJ MIKI: My Dj name is actually my nickname. That’s where it originated from. My passion for electronic music started in the late 90′s, and I was (and still is) a huge fan of Kylie Minogue. The musical talent and interest has always been there, as I went to music school when I was

12 years old, and I was playing the keyboard, piano and synth. I also went to dance and acting school for a couple of years, following Bachelors in Fine Arts in Theatre & Film Production at the University of British Columbia.  My plans for the near future are to create my own record label in the future and become a music producer. I really love the idea behind creating, arranging music, and working with a creative and talented team to make a masterpiece.

ministori: All the best with your future aspirations, Miki. Creating a label is huge! Can’t wait to hear where your skill and creativity take you.

→ To purchase more of Domino Grey’s music check out his iTunes page, thedynamicuniverse, or cdbaby for the physical release. Stay tuned for up coming interviews with the female vocal and musical talent of  the album! ↓

READ Part I with Domino Grey

READ Part III With Melody Diagnosis player Donna Schwartz

Back in the Black after-release REMIX EP “My Heart Never Skips a Beat”

September 13, 2011 1 comment

Dynamica Music Presents:

Domino Grey & DJ MIKI

My Heart Never Skips a Beat Remixes for Extended Play

From the album Back in the Black

Artwork for EP featuring talented Singer and Producer DJ MIKI

My Heart Never Skips a Beat Remixes for Extended Play

The hit album Back in the Black is given Extended Play with a remix emergency from Domino Grey. The popular song “My Heart Never Skips a Beat” is addressed by Dr Domino Grey and Dynamics Plus. After the frenetic opening, Domino settles in and focuses on the haunting voice of talented singer and producer – DJ MIKI. Her voice becomes the centerpiece for the first Back in the Black after-mix release.

Two new tracks round out the package. “Faint Murmurings and Light Musings” and “Errors and Eros, Paths and Pathos” are sure to sink you into the blue of a beating, bleating heartbeat.

Available as a direct download from CDbaby and iTunes and at http://www.TheDynamicUniverse.com

Thank you for supporting Dynamica Music, DJ MIKI and Domino Grey.

http://www.thedynamicuniverse.com/

Domino Grey album Back in the Black

September 12, 2011 1 comment

Domino Grey

Dance Or Move In Natural Order       Generate Rhythmic Energy Yourself

Domino Grey album artwork Back in the Black

Domino Grey is Back in the Black

Domino Grey is a child of rhythm- born from the Organic Electronic. The mixture of our Past and Future presents us with a sonic footprint- a quiet moment in time when silence expressed our deepest emotions and music was the only word spoken. These are cascading thoughts falling across a canvass of sound. Use these new colors to illustrate your imagination. Please touch the walls and leave behind the fingerprints as evidence of your existence.

Domino Grey is Back in the Black, another genre-smashing album featuring the vocal talents of FarishaMusic, Stephanie kay, Shea Lizette, DJ Miki, Elina Milan and instrumental work from Donna Schwartz. It’s a sonic blitz of beats, bumpers and beautiful music from the producer Domino Grey.

 

 

Back in the Black track listing

01 Put Your Headphones On 90 bpms (FarishaMusic)

02 You’re My Addiction 120 Bpms (Stephanie Kay and Shea Lizette)

03 I Aint Mad at You 90 Bpms (Shea The Doll Lizette)

04 Studio Outtake: She has a Blurry Focus

05 London Ferry 130 bpms

06 Desiree Desire 125 bpms

007 Danger Danger 120 bpms (Stephanie Kay)

08 My Heart Never Skips a Beat 120 bpms (DJ Miki)

09 Winding Down With You 91 Bpms

10 Studio Outtake 02 Shea’s Secret

11 Take Me Home 120 bpms (FarishaMusic)

12 Love Song for Freedom 130 bpms

13 Enter the Slots 127 Bpms (Winning on the Floor- Twice in One Night)

14 Melody Diagnosis 134 Bpms (Brass -Donna Schwartz)

15 Stirrer’s Pot 120 Bpms

16 You’re just Like a Dream to Me 116 Bpms (feat Shea The Doll Lizette)

17 It’s Time for You to Go 101 Bpms (Elina Milan) + Studio Outtake 03

Inside CD booklet artwork

Some of the beautiful talent featured on Back in the Black

Domino music is inspired by love and lost, remembrance, rhythm and redemption. Behind your sad eyes lies the power to change the world. Keep on dancing and singing. Art is the release valve of the soul.

http://www.TheDynamicUniverse.com

Also available on iTunes

miniStori Blogsite launches a series on the Domino Grey album Back in the Black

September 12, 2011 2 comments

Domino Grey series on the MiniStori Blogsite  http://ministori.wordpress.com/2011/09/11/grey-days/

There’s a huge series starting with interviews based on the Back in the Black album.

Here we go….

_____________________

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It isn’t often that we here at ministori are presented with the opportunity to to cover anything of importance. Luckily for myself (and you all) this just happens to be one of those rare occasions. I recently sat down with prolific artist / producer extraordinaire Domino Grey to discuss the new direction of his latest release, Back in the Black

Image of Producer/Artist Domino Grey

Domino in his Dominion

ministori:  The new album is a different animal than the first. What changed about you and your music between albums?

Domino Grey: I think the feedback from the first album built up my confidence enough to really reach out and work with different artists. I was able to send everyone the first album [Get it Up, Lay it Down] and say “This is what I want to do with you, are you in?” Every artist needs that thing that makes them grow up. I feel like I’ve grown doing this.

ministori: What caused you to grow?

Domino Grey: The realization that sometimes… the person you are is keeping you from becoming the person you want to be. I have all kinds of ideas. Some of them get put in the box of someday. Someday I’ll be ready or someday the timing will be just right or someday… I wake up and see that instead of waiting for the world to become… perfect, I can change, adapt and grow into the kind of person that can do today what I didn’t think I could do yesterday. Shit, I hope that made sense.

ministori: How did you go about picking artist to collaborate with, I’ve noticed they were all of the female variety?

Domino Grey: Oh I heard some comments. When the album artwork was done, a few people said stuff like “Oh I see how you pick artists.” It just so happens that they are all attractive, but to be honest I didn’t know what anyone besides the singers in my circle looked like until the records made the album. They could have been hideous wildebeests and they still would have been featured. For real. Song – wise, I just went with the stuff that I connected with and then whatever fit the album’s tone.

ministori: So I guess this was just a best case scenario situation, lucky you. Moving on, your brand of EDM seems to be an amalgam of various musical influences. Do you feel that such a mixture of genres will be a help or a hindrance in expressing your vision and creating a following?

Domino Grey: So far my mix has worked out. The reviews are really good and people are saying they like songs based in genres that they don’t usually check for. I feel like I live in a mix and singles world so banking it all on an album is somewhat of an old thought. I mean, I put a lot of thought into the order of the songs as I try to create a sort of journey. But so many people say I made my own playlist of your stuff or my iPod is on shuffle or a DJ will say I’m playing XYZ tracks and any kind of continuity is broken anyway.

I mean, for EVERY style I dabble in, people say “You should just make that from now on.” The trick is going to be- to make enough music so that they are satisfied. That’s why this album jumped in track count. That’s also why I started the Elevator Music series. That gives me the freedom to collect a group of similar tracks without confining and defining the musical direction of my Domino Grey work.

ministori: So what about the features on the album, how do they fit into your world?

Domino Grey: Well, I could spell out their general feelings, but maybe it would be best for them to speak their piece in their own words.

ministori: I like that.

Oh yeah, I’m really happy with this album. Stay tuned in; I’ve got a very fresh remix EP based around the track “My Heart Never Skips a Beat” [DJ MIKI]. It’s really sick. So thanks for checking out my music and thanks for the interview.

→ To purchase more of Domino Grey’s music check out his iTunes page, or cdbaby for the physical release. And definitely stay tuned for up coming interviews with the female vocal and musical talent of  the album! ↓

 

Read Part II with DJ MIKI

Domino Grey Letters and Numbers

September 2, 2011 2 comments

Domino Grey Letters and Numbers

 

Artist Domino Grey pictured in studio

I’m an iron-clad warrior with an iron will and indomitable spirit. I forge ahead with total conviction and do not care what others think about me or my music. Well, most days. I try to have the usual industry-standard thick skin and take most reviews of my music with a grain of salt. I mean, mostly it’s only a mofo’s opinion, aint it? As an artist I tend to make music for other people. No, scratch that. I make music for myself, but I release music for other people’s enjoyment. The stuff that’s strictly for me stays on the hard drive. I do my best to respond to criticism, complaints and, believe it or not, even special requests. I usually answer most letters or comments that are sent my way. The stuff that’s positive is great, the stuff that’s negative gets ignored- I mean, if you don’t like my music, my attitude is “move along citizen, there’s nothing to see here”. What I consider most important is when someone likes my records and suggests what I could do to have them like it more. That’s huge. And so, when I got this letter, I read it several times and aw shoot, here it is:

 Just listened to the album. My thoughts are that it does show progress on the Domino Grey side. However, I will stand behind the fact that it is not commercially viable; it is more niche viable without a doubt. In order to do commercial music, you must be in tune with the current scene as it shows that 99% of it sounds the same. Your music does not sound like 100% of the music they make-which is a plus in terms of differentiation but bad as a commercial vehicle. I prefer the hip-hop side of Dynamics Plus because I believe he wasn’t truly promoted to his core audience and had and still has the tools to be an underground superstar.  

My first reaction was, eh no big deal. Some cat likes my raps better than my dancier stuff. The buzz behind my music has been the same for years. “That Dynamics Plus (also in the rap group Lenzmen) don’t give a crap about nobody or sales or anything. He just does what he do and keeps it moving”. Not exactly true. I care about the people that support my music. I write to the best of my creative ability because I care. If a dude says “Dynamics Plus is the best lyricist of all time” I want that person to have the songs and quotes to back that up. I want to hear killer lyrics so I write them as best I can. The Lenzmen were completely opposed to commercial success. It was a badge of honor to be considered underground and known to select few- like we were too deep for the world to ever appreciate. And I think we would have quit a long time ago if it ever became hip to like The Lenzmen. We actually ran from opportunities, but I’m no longer an angry rebellious teenager and I no longer think every rapper sucks besides us. Well okay, deep down I still kinda do. But that’s a tangent for another day. The letter goes on to say:

Domino Grey is not a commercial artist, but an extension of a commercialized underground universe. That is where I see him. Ideally, we must walk our own journeys in life: if you want that commercial admiration and financial success with Domino Grey, you have to negate 20+ years of mainstream defiance you had with your hip-hop and truly commit to that goal. Lady Gaga, Rhianna, Black Eyed Peas, Katy Perry is Top 10-20 radio. Make songs with true intensions to shop to them-listen to their music and make it fit for them-not what you want to hear.

Ouch. I guess what this person missed about Domino Grey is that he has the same outlook as Dynamics Plus and his abstract, super-complicated, scientific raps. I make electronic music that melds multiple genres and pushes the envelope as I hear it. I want the world to enjoy it, but on my terms. When I make music, I don’t think Dollars and Cents, I think Knowledge and Sense. I have some very talented artists involved with the Domino Grey albums. I can appreciate it if they are inspired by the top names on the music scene, but it’s a foolish notion that I would invest this kind of energy into being a clone of someone else or be happy doing more of what’s already being done. I apologize to all those involved if you believed my aim was to make a ton of money off making electronic music. I came to do the same thing I’ve always done. Sound like me and hopefully give you something fresh and pleasing to listen to.

Let me know if I have succeeded. Hit me at the usual places.

*Added a new Facebook link on the left.

You can preview my music on iTunes.

visit my homepage

– Domino Grey Fall 2011

Domino Grey Back in the Black Q&A: I Can’t Call It- calls it

September 1, 2011 1 comment

http://icantcallit.wordpress.com/2011/08/31/1020/

I did a Q&A about the new album Back in the Black

You can preview all the tracks on CDbaby or iTunes so you can hear it for yourself.

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/dominogrey3

http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/back-in-the-black/id457903033

Domino Grey-Back In Black

“Why ruin a good thing??” Many can say that whenever a popular artist of a particular genre ventures out of his comfort zone into uncharted territories. Many feel an abandonment, or sense of “selling out”, while others feel a plague of “another person joining the herd”. Is experimentation a bad thing?? Is testing new art forms for the sense of self-expression a great thing?? True creativity should be limitless, and not be restricted. However, I feel an artist should not lose his or her entire “core” audience for the sake of gaining new admiration. An artist should let his or her audience grow with them as they grow and explore this new creative realm within themselves. Some artist truly want self-fulfillment and don’t care what the audience thinks (which in itself, can be more endearing than those who go out-of-the-way to please all). I recently heard a great quote from Lenzmen emcee and super-producer Dynamics Plus, who said: “Once my music is out to the public, it is opened to be judged. If they like it or hate it, there’s nothing  I can do about it.” Domino Grey’s album “Back In Black” is his journey, his artistic exploration to find out how far he can push his talents. He is ready for the repercussions, the backlash. All to test his creative limitations. “Why restrict a good thing??”

I’ve called you “The Quincy Jones of Underground Hip-Hop”. Was there any pressure following up such an experimental album, Get It Up, Lay It Down???

I remember you saying that. I thought you must be needing tracks for your next project. Nice words, but certainly undeserved. Um pressure? No, not really. I mean, I don’t struggle with making music anymore. It’s not always easy getting what you hear in your head recorded, but this is my sound so of course I can be consistent with my output.

How would you compare this album with your last efforts???

More musical. The first album said “Dynamics Plus presents Domino Grey”. That tells you about how important the underlying beats were. Back in the Black says “Drew Spence presents” which speaks to the production elements surrounding the songs themselves.

 What were the influences you channeled (if any) for this record???

To follow the same idea, it was the feedback from the first album that set the tone for the second. Listeners wanted more songs. Check. They wanted more traditional arrangements. Gotcha. I personally felt like Get it Up was a collection of songs and their collective vibe told you what Domino Grey was about.

Back in the Black does that too, but I put the studio outtakes to hint at the back story that goes on while these songs are made. My experiences dictate what songs I create and choose to release so the album should give hints about the me behind the music.

Do you feel this album can infiltrate the current electronic scene???

I dunno. A lot of DJs have the record so I expect a lot more exposure for this album and the label is also doing more to promote it. I think it’s a little too early for me to really be worried about a scene anyway. I just want as many people as possible to enjoy what I’m doing. And since I tend to incorporate so many different styles in my music, it would be pretty hard to categorize what I do. I think that would be another problem with establishing my sound in a particular sub-genre.

They say “lightning rarely strikes twice” in the music world. Seeing that your first album was the world’s introduction to Domino Grey, what can be said about this record???

I’d say now that you met me, let’s have a conversation. This album features some very talented artists and in a way it’s become more about them than me. So listen in.

 Final thoughts to any hip-hop artist who’s afraid to expand outside of their musical realm???

Um…don’t do it. Seriously. There isn’t a genre that’s short on musicians or artists. EDM doesn’t need Domino Grey. I am injecting myself with the full confidence that people will enjoy my music.  I’m serious about my music. I see dudes claiming they can make this and that and do multiple styles or genres. Their music isn’t inspired; it’s just going through the motions and adding the signature elements that define those genres. What’s the point of doing what’s already being done? My advice is to stick with music you believe in.

What’s next for Domino Grey?

More music. I am involved in another project called Elevator Music. It’s Drew Spence and Xodus Phoenix from Producer’s Edge and Dynamics Plus. It’s a bunch of us making instrumental music together under the name fallout Shelter. I’ll be sure to hit you with that when it’s ready. Hey, thanks for the ear.

You can preview all the tracks on CDbaby or iTunes so you can hear it for yourself.

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/dominogrey3

http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/back-in-the-black/id457903033

Domino Grey Back in the Black

August 18, 2011 2 comments

Domino Grey

Dance Or Move In Natural Order       Generate Rhythmic Energy Yourself

Domino Grey is a child of rhythm- born from the Organic Electronic. The mixture of our Past and Future presents us with a sonic footprint- a quiet moment in time when silence expressed our deepest emotions and music was the only word spoken. These are cascading thoughts falling across a canvass of sound. Use these new colors to illustrate your imagination. Please touch the walls and leave behind the fingerprints as evidence of your existence.

Domino Grey album cover Back in the Black

Domino Grey Back in the Black

Domino Grey is Back in the Black, another genre-smashing album featuring the vocal talents of FarishaMusic, Stephanie kay, Shea Lizette, DJ Miki, Elina Milan and instrumental work from Donna Schwartz. It’s a sonic blitz of beats, bumpers and beautiful music from the producer Domino Grey.

featured talent Domino Grey Back in the Black


 Back in the Black track listing

01 Put Your Headphones On 90 bpms (FarishaMusic)

02 You’re My Addiction 120 Bpms (Stephanie Kay and Shea Lizette)

03 I Aint Mad at You 90 Bpms (Shea The Doll Lizette)

04 Studio Outtake: She has a Blurry Focus

05 London Ferry 130 bpms

06 Desiree Desire 125 bpms

007 Danger Danger 120 bpms (Stephanie Kay)

08 My Heart Never Skips a Beat 120 bpms (DJ Miki)

09 Winding Down With You 91 Bpms

10 Studio Outtake 02 Shea’s Secret

11 Take Me Home 120 bpms (FarishaMusic)

12 Love Song for Freedom 130 bpms

13 Enter the Slots 127 Bpms (Winning on the Floor- Twice in One Night)

14 Melody Diagnosis 134 Bpms (Brass -Donna Schwartz)

15 Stirrer’s Pot 120 Bpms

16 You’re just Like a Dream to Me 116 Bpms (feat Shea The Doll Lizette)

17 It’s Time for You to Go 101 Bpms (Elina Milan) + Studio Outtake 03

Domino music is inspired by love and lost, remembrance, rhythm and redemption. Behind your sad eyes lies the power to change the world. Keep on dancing and singing. Art is the release valve of the soul.

 

Available at iTunes from Dynamica Music